Tag Archive | myalgia

The BIG Fibromyalgia Diagnosis

So, you went to the doctor and she/he said you have fibromyalgia.  I’m sure your heart sunk.  You probably, like me, thought what now.  My life is over.  I’ll never be the same again.  There goes my quality of life.  You probably did your research online before being diagnosed.  Everyone does.  We usually go in to our doctor’s office with the information and present the disease to them.  I hope that you were given a battery of tests, before slapping a diagnosis on you.  This is a disease of exclusion (the ONE thing I WANT EVERYONE to know and learn).  The doctor should run a battery of tests to exclude anything and everything.  They should be looking for several things like (but not limited too) Lyme’s disease, thyroid issues, arthritis, candida, hormonal issues, etc.  There’s so much that should be ruled out.

So now that diagnosis is made.  For some, it’s relief and some it’s depressing.  Let me assure you that your life is not over because of this diagnosis.  This is just a new way of life.  You are not going to die from this disease.  It is just a shift in the way your going to be living the rest of your life.  It will change how you plan your life from here on out.  Your daily, weekly and monthly activities will change.  You will learn to manage your time and energy.  Some days you will have a ton of energy and pain.  Other days, it will be less.  Please do not use all your energy in one day.  You will pay for it the next.  Spread out activities, like household chores.  Instead of doing all of your housework in one day spread the chores throughout the week.  When planning a family activity, don’t do anything the day before.  Save your energy for friends and family.  It’s a matter of learning to manage energy levels.  Managing energy can help manage the amount of pain you will be in and vice versa.

 

 

Chapter 2-Three Things We Know About Fibromyalgia

There is a lot of good content in this chapter, so bear with me as I share it.  Let me know what you think!  The information in this chapter discussion are not meant to diagnose or treat fibromyalgia.  Always, check with your doctor before beginning any treatment.

Despite being the second most prevalent rheumatologic disease, there has been relatively little research undertaken to understand Fibromyalgia.

1. Fibromyalgia is Associated with Disordered Pain Processing

The evidence in the medical literature is strongly supportive of abnormal processing of pain information in the central nervous system to physically induced pain such as pressure, heat, cold, or electrical stimulation resulting from generalized lowered pain thresholds in fibromyalgia.  The evidence is strongly supportive of an abnormality in the central nervous system pain processing known as central nervous system sensitization or central sensitization for short.  People with fibromyalgia feel pain more readily and with a much higher sensitivity, than those without fibromyalgia.  There is clear evidence for increased sensitivity to external painful stimuli in patients with fibromyalgia.

There are, also, neurotransmitter abnormalities which can be associated with serotonin level issues.  Not source or cause of pain has been identified in all of the studies.  Studies have not identified the sources or cause of the seemingly spontaneous pain reported in fibromyalgia.

2.  The Treatment of Fibromyalgia is Profoundly Disappointing.

Patients are being told they have a chronic painful disease that may impair their ability to function with no known cause, cure, or highly effective treatment and that they must learn to live with it.

Medications do not seem to help much.  Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are frequently prescribed despite the evidence indicating that they are no better than the placebo.  Prednisone has not been show to be of benefit, either.  Analgesics are also frequently used in managing fibromyalgia symptoms despite little data regards their effectiveness.  Acetaminophen has shown less benefit.  Tramadol (Ultram) is a weak opioid medication.  There is some benefit using it alone or in combination with acetaminophen.  Antidepressant and other psychoactive medications are used frequently to manage the symptoms of fibromyalgia.  The most used and studied is Elavil and the muscle relaxant Flexeril.  In low doses (10-50 mg daily) Elavil has shown improved pain.  Flexeril in studies (given 10-40 mg daily) have reported improvement in pain, sleep, global well-being, and fatigue.  Long term use of either Elavil or Flexeril is unknown.  Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (like Prozac, Celexa, and Zoloft) are a class of drugs that have been highly successful in treating psychiatric conditions such as depression, anxiety, and phobias.  When given to treat fibromyalgia in studies, they are not consistently showing improvement in pain.  But one study using Prozac and Elavil showed they were more effective in reducing pain and symptoms than either drug alone.  When studies were conducted using Effexor the results were mixed and inconsistent.  Cymbalta (used in studies) showed some improvement in some but not all pain measures, reduction in tender point counts, and some improved quality of life measures in women with fibromyalgia, but not in men.  S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) is a compound that has antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties.  One trial showed improved mood and tender points, another showed improvement in mood, pain, overall disease activity and fatigue, and a third study showed no benefit.  Studies using Neurontin and/or Lyrica demonstrated improvements in pain, sleep, fatigue, and global symptom severity in higher doses. A placebo controlled trial to assess the benefit of Lyrica in patients with fibromyalgia showed that 63% of patients achieved significant reduction of pain initially, and after 26 weeks of treatment, 32% of those patients lost the therapeutic response achieved at onset but significantly more patients sustained a defined improvement compared to placebo treatment.  The expectorant guaifenesin has been used to treat fibromyalgia on the assumed, but unproved, theory that there is an excess accumulation of phosphate in the muscles and that this can be excreted by the action of guaifenesin.   A one year double blind controlled trial failed to demonstrate any improvement in global functioning or tender point counts.

The medication trial data do show that Flexeril and Elavil appear to be the most helpful drugs in managing fibromyalgia for reasons to be yet determined.

Study programs providing exercise about 1-3 times weekly for a range of about 6 weeks to 6 months and involved either walking, bicycling, dancing, or swimming with or without accompanying education, showed improvement in pain, pain threshold, tender point counts, fatigue, quality of life, and psychological distress.  But improvement is not uniformly noted.  Maximal exercise has been shown to increase pain sensitivity in patients with fibromyalgia.  The degree of improvement is not dramatic.  Tender point pain threshold improves by 28% and pain is reduced by 11%.  Some patients receive nominal benefit from aerobic cardiovascular fitness training while others cannot tolerate such programs.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) programs include education, coping skills training, cognitive and behavioral training, and relapse prevention.  All programs are centered around fibromyalgia.  Additional components may include relaxation training, stress management, biofeedback, meditation, exercise, physical therapy, or occupational therapy.  Studies are showing benefits from CBT.  There is improvement in pain, tender point counts, stiffness, stress when stress management is incorporated, distress, functional ability, sleep mood including depression and anxiety, and general healthy assessment.  And it sustained up to 30 months following completion of the program.

It is virtually impossible to perform blinded studies with regard to the patient and the treatment provider for non-medication interventions.  Hands-on type treatments are subjective in their application and difficult to standardize.  Some of those treatments are Electromyography (EMG) biofeedback, hypnosis and relaxation training, meditation, neck support, acupuncture, nutritional interventions and dietary supplements, whirlpool baths with valerian, dietary modifications, static magnet therapy, chiropractic intervention, massage therapy.  As with all the other treatments reviewed, the treatment trial data clearly tell us that fibromyalgia is not a homogeneous disease or process and that we have no clue as to what to target any treatment against nor how to measure its benefit.

3.  Patients with Fibromyalgia Do Not Do Well In the Long-Term

Patients with fibromyalgia in general do not do well in the long term, although those with milder symptoms may do better because inherently they have less severe symptoms and involvement.

The Fibromyalgia Diet: Eating for a Better Quality of Life

There has been little information available from the scientific community on nutrition and diet for Fibromyalgia patients. Research has not yet proven that any specific foods affect Fibromyalgia, positively or negatively. But we do know that eating a good balanced diet helps everyone’s body function at its best. Good nutrition can help in your health and healing. Eating healthful foods including those low in fat and high in immunity boosting antioxidants and phytochemicals may work together to help maximize energy and alertness and minimize constant fatigue and lethargy.

Many people have overcome their Fibromyalgia symptoms by changing their lifestyle and diet. Mary Moeller, author and spokeswoman on Fibromyalgia, now enjoys a state of remission from her Fibromyalgia symptoms by making a few changes in her lifestyle. To reach this ideal she advocates eliminating 4 foods completely from your diet (Mary Moeller’s Fibromyalgia Cookbook.)

    1. Chocolate
    1. Carbonated beverages
    1. Coffee
    1. Alcohol

Along with changes in nutrition she encourages stretching, exercising and drinking 8+ glasses of water a day. Also, in Mary Moeller and Joe Elrod’s book, The Fibromyalgia Nutrition Guide, they advocate a more complete list in order to overcome fatigue and feel your best. The 12 items to avoid are:

    1. High fat dairy foods
    1. White sugar and white flour
    1. Fried foods
    1. Preservatives, junk food, and salt
    1. Red meat (especially salt cured, cured bacon, smoked, or nitrate cured)
    1. Coffee and caffeinated teas
    1. Colas, soda pop, and carbonated beverages
    1. Liquid with your meals
    1. Alcoholic beverages
    1. All forms of tobacco
    1. Prolonged periods of direct sun exposure
    1. Nutrasweet and saccharine

Along with Mary Moeller and others, I also have enjoyed the benefits of better health after quitting carbonated beverages and coffee. Before, I would have my diet coke and coffee in order to get me out of bed in the morning. As a result I was very hyper and then about 2 hours later or so I would crash and be very tired and fatigued. So I would pump more caffeine and diet coke down to get me moving again. As a result I would spike, crash, spike, crash.

My energy level was on a continual roller coaster ride of highs and lows. Since quitting I have been enjoying a nice steady stream of constant energy all day long. When I first heard of eliminating sodas I was mortified. I thought I was doing extremely well to only allow myself 1-2 cokes a day, and to give them up, why I thought, “never”! But little by little I finally weaned myself off, and boy am I glad I did. I have so much more energy.

Some unsubstantiated studies claim that carbonated beverages leak phosphorus from your bones, and the aspartame (Nutrasweet) in sodas cause memory loss. Others have claimed the sugar in carbonated beverages (some as many as 12-14 teaspoons) may contribute to yeast problems.

Caffeine in soda and other beverages is a diuretic, which means you need to drink additional water to replace the lost water. Scientists at Washington State University found that caffeine makes people lose calcium in their urine faster than they usually do. Caffeine can also put added stress on the adrenal glands and the liver. Since most Fibromyalgia sufferers may have adrenal malfunction due to chronic stress and inadequate nutrition it is probably wise to avoid the caffeine and carbonated drinks.

I know that at times I eat more food or sugar as a way of dealing with stress or handling challenging problems that arise. When I do this it puts added stress on my adrenal glands. Adrenalin released from the adrenal gland penalizes the body and can cause acute symptoms. By burning too much sugar your body may deplete its vitamins and minerals especially the B vitamins. Adrenalin has even been known to be responsible for some panic attacks.

If you subject your body to highly refined, over-processed foods, sugar, caffeine, pork, junk food, highly processed starches, additives and preservatives, and highly acid foods, it is possible that your body will suffer because of an already compromised immune system that may be found in many Fibromyalgia sufferers.

Most processed foods are often adulterated by heating, and are full of additives, preservatives, colorings, salt and sugar. Fried foods and salt have been found to aggravate pain or swelling in some Fibromyalgia patients. By the way, most drinks purchased at a store have been processed including soda, bottled juices, coffee, alcohol and others. Since many Fibromyalgia patients are sensitive to food, drugs, chemicals and pollutants in the environment anyway it is important we do not subject our bodies to more than what’s necessary.

Even many non-processed foods or “natural” foods can be hazardous to the health of Fibromyalgia patients. Many Fibromyalgia patients are chocoholics. Chocolate is high in fat and caffeine. According to Mark Pellegrino in his book, Fibro Survivor, reducing fatty intake could increase energy. Don’t be fooled when buying dietary chocolate, which has no added sugar. Although they may have replaced the sugar with manitol or nutrasweet the fat caloric content still remains high. Therefore a low fat diet is recommended. This means chocolate should not be ingested or should be eaten in moderation.

Certain foods have been found to cause fatigue. Doctors concluded in Annals of Rheumatic Disease that in certain individuals some foods aggravate arthritis. Often, foods that are acidic are the culprit. Therefore an arthritic diet is one that remains alkaline. Some Fibromyalgia patients find that highly acidic foods such as citric, foods in the nightshade family like tomato, potato, eggplant, and peppers, red meat, cow milk products, brown and white wheat flour products, sugar containing foods, coffee, chocolate all seem to trigger more muscle pain.

Different foods affect each individual Fibromyalgia patient differently. For instance some Fibromyalgia patients have severe food allergies for dairy, wheat, corn, nightshade family plants, etc. whereas others do not. You can discover your own food sensitivity by eliminating foods that trigger pain. Keeping a food diary can help. In your diary write down everything that goes into your mouth and at the same time track your Fibromyalgia pain. By comparing the two you may discover that certain foods may trigger allergies or pain. It has been found that food allergies may undermine your nutrient uptake.

In a 1992 study as reported in the book, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Fibromyalgia, by Paul St. Amand M.D. and Claudia Marek, it states that:

60% of Fibromyalgia patients of normal weight crave carbohydrates, and 75% of obese Fibromyalgia patients crave carbohydrates.

However, cravings for carbohydrates are not limited to Fibromyalgia sufferers and therefore, can’t be considered a unique characteristic of individuals suffering from Fibromyalgia.

Some Fibromyalgia patients have a low carbohydrate intolerance or reactive hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) that occurs after eating carbohydrates. This can cause problems metabolizing carbohydrates, inability to lose weight, fatigue, carbohydrate craving and worsening symptoms. Carbohydrates stimulate insulin production. Excess insulin can cause an increased uptake of sugar into muscle and liver, which can be stored as fatty acids in fat cells, and prevent carbs from being used.

There are nutritional strategies to help Fibromyalgia patients. Dr. Mark Pellegrino says that because of the biochemical changes in Fibromyalgia patients it makes good medical sense to try a low carb, high protein diet. Protein diets can decrease cravings, increase energy, lose weight and help with hypoglycemia. Pellegrino suggests watching carb’s like bread, potatoes and refined sugars. There are many fad protein diets like Sugar busters, Zone, Adkins and other low carb diets. However, Pellegrino says that some Fibromyalgia patients do not tolerate a protein diet as well as others, so experiment and find what dietary plan works for you.

Dr. August believes that a 30/30/40 ratio of carbohydrate, fat and protein enables Fibromyalgia patients to reach their optimum weight with maximum health. Hypoglycemia and low carb intolerance can be controlled by diet. Dr. August advocates the Zone diet (Sears and Lawren 1995).

However, there is strong evidence that the Zone diet “works” mainly because of the reduction in total caloric intake with little or nothing to do with the release of insulin. The reader is referred to some excellent websites that present pro and con arguments over the Zone and other low carb/high protein/high fat diets:

    • watchingweight.com/lowcarb.htm
    • cyberiron.com/nutrition/notzone.html
    • getzoned.com.au/In_the_Media_text_only.htm
    • nutrition.ucdavis.edu/perspectives/SeptOct99.htm

Your cells must receive nourishment and eliminate wastes. When you start to eat healthful foods you may find that you crave sugar, fat, starch and processed foods. This is a normal occurrence due to a physiological change in your body’s chemistry. During the transition time try not to indulge in sugar, fat and processed foods. These cravings will become fewer and further between as time goes on. Of course, people who do not suffer from Fibromyalgia also have the same cravings; therefore, we are not unique.

People with Fibromyalgia need to take extra care to eat well. Try to incorporate raw foods into your diet. I try to eat a piece of raw fruit or vegetable for breakfast and a raw vegetable or salad for lunch. Raw foods contain enzymes that can assist in the digestion of foods. Raw foods are full of antioxidants and phytochemicals that help boost the immune system.

If have a juicer, fresh carrot juice is a wonderful addition to incorporate into your lifestyle. Many people have claimed to heal cancer along with an array of diseases by eating raw foods and drinking carrot juice. Of course, most of these claims are testimonials with little scientific research to back the use of raw foods to prevent chronic disease.

Along with vegetables, and fruits, omega 3 fish oil contains anti-inflammatory properties. Eating well does not mean you have to starve yourself or totally eliminate all the foods you love. Rather make small gradual changes and focus on the foods you enjoy.

Eating well may help reduce the fatigue and maximize energy. Incorporate variety, balance and moderation. Improve your health by reevaluating your overall eating habits and try making your diet more nutritious. Your body has been wonderfully and marvelously designed. Do you allow it to run as efficiently as possible?

The photochemicals present in vegetables and fruits have been shown to have a protective effect against many chronic diseases including heart disease and cancer the second most prevalent killers in the U.S. These same phytochemicals may help reduce the pain response among Fibromyalgia patients. Although definitive solutions to the Fibromyalgia dilemma await research verification it is my thought that we begin to incorporate more “raw foods or slightly cooked” vegetables and fruits into our diet in order to live a quality life.

Look for healthy recipes on our website (www.fibrofog.com) that use the principles of good eating discussed in this article. The bonus (as testified to by my husband) is that you will be considered a “gourmet cook” as your health improves.

This information was developed and written by Colleen Black-Brown.

(c) Colleen Black-Brown. All rights reserved. Website: http://www.fibrofog.com

Found on http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=8287 on 1/19/15

Turmeric

Ayurvedic Notes

Turmeric invigorates and moves the blood. Its strong nature reduces and treats weakness. It stimulates blood formation. Its yellow color suggests use as a liver herb. A small dose cleans the liver and blood due to bitter taste. Turmeric is used in all blood and blood plasma related disorders, especially those due to Pitta and Kapha. Its heat alleviates Vata and Kapha. A large dose aggravates Pitta.

Yogis use turmeric to help stretch ligaments and repair injury. Liver heat is connected to laxity of the tendons and ligaments.

Spring Cleansing

Turmeric improves circulation and thins the blood, giving the blood subtle quality to enter and clean the lymphatic system as well as all vessels and tissues. Its ability to move the blood dries dampness and increases heat. Turmeric’s ability to support the liver while cleansing the lymphatic system make it an ideal herb for spring cleansing (along with beets and dandelions). Turmeric’s blood moving, and clearing properties are also beneficial for use in arthritis.

Liver, the Blood and Gynecology

Turmeric stimulates the liver (ranjaka Pitta) and bile flow, dissolving and preventing gallstones. It is a blood purifier specifically used to promote beautiful skin and eliminate systemic toxemia, eczema, urticaria, psoriasis, and acne. It helps with itching and skin problems due to cold, dry or stagnant qualities of other doshas (sheetaPitta). Turmeric is often mixed with other bitter herbs to enhance its anti-inflammatory and liver clearing effects. It nourishes the heart and reduces cholesterol. Its anti-platelet activity prevents coagulation and reduces Kapha in blood. Its antiseptic activity is useful for infections, fevers, and sore throats.

Digestion

Turmeric improves digestive strength by increasing blood flow. It is an antiseptic that promotes “sweet intestines”, or intestines free of bacteria and ama. Its haemostatic and anti-inflammatory qualities treat stomach ulcers and colitis. Turmeric improves rasa agni, or the “body’s raw power to nourish plasma and the blood”. It clears ama, Kapha, and fat in diabetes. Its blood moving qualities are useful in Alzheimer’s.

Turmeric destroys all Kapha accumulations in lower abdomen including endometriosis, amenorrhea, leucorrhea, fibroids, cancer and cysts from cold congestion. It promotes the flow of the menses and purifies breast milk. It specifically clears menstrual pain caused by arachidonic acid.

Inflammation & Joints

Turmeric is an anti-inflammatory with subtle quality to enter the joint space, reducing arthritis and inflammation, alleviating pain, and strengthening joints and tendons. It treats gout, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis. Its anti-inflammatory activities are also useful in asthma, broken bones, and wounds. By its heating and blood moving qualities, turmeric reduces pain topically in bruises and sprains however it stains everything it touches.

Other

Those with cough and respiratory problems can drink turmeric milk (see Gold Milk). Turmeric smoke cures hiccups and lowers respiration. It is an anti-venom for King Cobra snake bites. The fresh root is used as a suppository in the rectum to cleanse and open the root chakra. Turmeric burns ama, reducing its diuretic effect. Contraindications include pregnancy, with other anti-coagulants, antiplatelets and (COX) inhibitors. Be careful when gallstones present. Caution in high Pitta/Vata.

Turmeric in Chinese Medicine

Turmeric, called Jiang Huang in Chinese medicine, addresses the spleen, stomach and liver meridians. It invigorates the blood, promotes movement of blood, unblocks the menses, chest and abdominal pain, alleviates amenorrhea and dysmenorrhea with cold deficiency, and swelling pain or pain due to obstruction. It expels wind.

About

Turmeric is a warm, yellow, earthy, slightly bitter spice used in ritual, medicine, and cooking. Turmeric paste is applied to bride and groom before marriage in some places of India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Although a deep yellow color, turmeric makes a poor fabric dye because it quickly fades when exposed to light. Turmeric can be used as an indicator of acidic or basic properties of a substance.

Chapter 1-Pain From Nowhere: Fibromyalgia is A Failure of Medical Science

Who would want a disease or a diagnosis of a disease that has been described for almost two hundred years, that correlates with widespread pain and causes widespread tenderness, is associated with a significantly disrupted sleep pattern, has no identified known causes, has no known treatment, is chronic, and will persist for the rest of one’s life?

Over 6 million Americans diagnosed with fibromyalgia have pain that apparently nobody knows the cause of or how it even develops.  It is noted as far back as 1816.  Fibromyalgia is one of the most prevalent rheumatic diseases encountered.  Fibromyalgia is characterized as a medically unexplained disease.

When patients with chronic widespread pain are examined for tender fibromyalgia points about 1 out of 5 individuals had 11 or more tender points.  The tenderness had little relationship to the pain itself and was better correlated with depression, fatigue, and poor sleep.  The painful tenderness is found in at least 11/18 fibromyalgia points.

The mean patient age, at time of the diagnosis, is forties to fifties.  It is more common in females.

The core symptom of fibromyalgia is chronic widespread pain.  It is mostly located in the soft tissues, especially in muscle areas.  The pain can vary over the course of a day as well as over days and weeks.  The pain is greater than that reported by rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Another problem associated with fibromyalgia is fatigue.  Sleep disruption is a significantly prominent and frequent feature of fibromyalgia.  Patients awake unrefreshed.  Patients show, in EEGs, that there is an intrusion on the stage 3 and 4 Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) deep sleep delta wave pattern.  It is worth noting that the experimental disruption of slow wave, stage 3 and 4 NREM sleep in healthy, normal individuals produces muscle aching, stiffness, and increased tenderness.

Cognitive impairments are also reported by many fibromyalgia patients.  They describe difficulty with short-term memory, concentration, and logical thinking.

Fibromyalgia patients have a greater number of lifetime psychiatric diagnoses compared to controls, especially mood disorders such as depression and anxiety disorders.  Major depression in 20-30% and anxiety disorder in 10-20% at the time of assessment were reported.  Psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety, stress disorders like post traumatic stress disorder, and sexual and physical abuses are identified in 75% of dysfunctional fibromyalgia patients.

Other symptoms reported by individuals with fibromyalgia includes headaches, restless leg syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, irritable bladder or female urethral syndrome, cold sensitivity along with cold hands and feet, sensitivity to chemicals, weather medications, loud noises, and bright lights, dry eyes and mouth, dizziness, paresthesia and dysesthesias (needles, pins, numbness, tingling, or unusual skin sensations) without obvious neurologic abnormality, skin photosensitivities, skin rashes and mouth ulcers.

There are no identified laboratory abnormalities that help diagnose, treat, or define prognosis of fibromyalgia.  The role of laboratory investigation in fibromyalgia is to assess for the presence of other conditions that co-exist with fibromyalgia or conditions producing fibromyalgia like syndromes.

Once a diagnosis of fibromyalgia is made, all other and subsequent complaints and findings that cannot be otherwise explained are attributed to fibromyalgia.  Forever.

Patients and doctors are in dire need of something new, different and more effective than the current thinking and treatment related to fibromyalgia.

Something to do today & Friends

Well, I had an errand to run today and had to do it no matter how I felt.  My aunt was counting on me and I already rescheduled.  We were supposed to do it on Tuesday.  So I felt obligated to do it.  I hate having to cancel on people when I am not feeling well.  It’s so inconvenient for the other person.  They get up and get ready and then I call and cancel their plans.  I hate it.  I feel like such a loser.  But the pain and exhaustion gets the best of me and I can’t function.

A few weeks ago I had plans with a friend that I just reconnected with after not talking for years.  I felt completely awful and couldn’t function.  I woke up at 4 am in horrible pain.  So I took my meds and knew I had to be up at 8 am.  So I set my alarm and when I woke up, I still felt awful.  My entire body was in pain and the medication, Flexeril, wasn’t working at all.  But it makes me extremely loopy.  So I sent her a text message at 8 am to let her know that I wasn’t going to be able to make it.  I didn’t want to call because I didn’t want to wake her up.  WELLLLL, that wasn’t the case at all.  I woke up at noon too missed phone calls and tones of texts.  In my loopy state, I sent my aunt the text that I couldn’t make it for coffee (to which she replied to me that she had no clue what I was talking about).  And texts, phone calls, and voice mail from my friend wondering where the heck I was.  I would have been so upset with me if I were her.  And that’s the life of a Fibromyalgia Sufferer!  My life is one big mixed up mess.

I feel awful that my life consists of constantly cancelling on people.  And I don’t know if they really understand what I am going through or not.  But I have to look at it from their perspective thinking how annoying I must be to have in the family or be friends with.

The Missing Pieces of the Fibromyalgia Puzzle by Jeff Sarkozi, MD, FRCPC, FACR

I will be venturing into this book.  I am looking forward to sharing it and educating you more about this disease/ailment.  Please follow me as I dive into this book that was so graciously gifted to me by my parents at Christmas!

www.missingpiecesfibromyalgia.com